Hello, Queens voters!

This summer we’re having TWO different primary elections in New York, and each election has different races on the ballot. Here are the dates for both primaries:

  • June 28th (early voting June 18 - 26) 

  • August 23rd (early voting August 13 - 21)

 

It can be hard to find info on candidates to help you decide who to vote for, or to understand what all of these local positions even do.

Early voting starts tomorrow, and I dug up info to wrote a short role description for each race in the Democratic primary (with lots of help from NYCvotes.org and some candidates themselves), and tried to find an online presence for as many candidates as possible, so we can be a little more informed in the voting booth.

 

But first:

  • Check your voter registration here - you must be enrolled in a party to vote in their primary elections.

  • Learn where to vote and view your sample ballot here: https://findmypollsite.vote.nyc/

 

And without further ado, here are the local races to know about for the June 28th Democratic Primary.

For all Queens Voters

A Quick note - Candidates with stars (***) next to their names appear to me to be the most progressive options, in case that helps you with your decision making in one way or the other.

Democratic Candidate for Governor

The Governor is the chief executive of New York. They sign or veto legislation, set the state’s yearly budget, and appoint leaders of state agencies such as the Department of Education.

 

Democratic Candidate for Lieutenant Governor

The Lieutenant Governor is the second-highest ranking official in NY state after the Governor, and serves  as President of the State Senate. They will become Governor if the Governor leaves office before the end of their term (as Kathy Hochul did when Cuomo resigned).

 

Democratic Nominee for Judge of the Civil Court - County Queens (choose 2)

Civil Court Judges can represent counties or districts, so you may see more than one Civil Court judge on your ballot. Judges are elected to 10-year terms and hear cases including Civil matters up to $25,000, landlord-tenant matters and cases involving maintenance of housing standards, and criminal prosecution of misdemeanors. More information about the candidates is in the Queens Daily Eagle. And learn about their Bar Association approval status here. I've starred the two judges who were "approved" as qualified by the Bar Association.

Find your Assembly District

The city is divided into different districts for different representation at the city, state, and national level. You might not know your Assembly District (AD), and there's a good chance its different from previous years after recent redistricting. You can find out what AD you're in here at https://findmypollsite.vote.nyc/

For Assembly District 36 (Most of Astoria)

Democratic Female State Committee Member 36th Assembly District

State committee members serve two-year terms and vote on elements of the party’s platform, decide who will represent the state to the national party, influence rules and regulations for the state’s democratic party, and help lead organizing efforts.

 

Democratic Male State Committee Member 36th Assembly District

State committee members serve two-year terms and vote on elements of the party’s platform, decide who will represent the state to the national party, influence rules and regulations for the state’s democratic party, and help lead organizing efforts.

Democratic Male District leader 36th Assembly District (Part B)

District leaders are volunteers elected for two-year terms to represent party members in their assembly district to the Queens Democratic Party. District leaders vote on party leadership, choose local judicial candidates, and influence policies for the local Democratic Party. 

 

Delegate to Democratic Judicial Convention 36th Assembly District (pick 12)

Judicial delegates are representatives from each Assembly District and serve a one-year term. They nominate their party’s local candidates for New York State Supreme Court Justice at the party’s annual Judicial District Convention.

 

For Assembly District 34

Democratic Female State Committee Member 34th Assembly District

State committee members serve two-year terms and vote on elements of the party’s platform, decide who will represent the state to the national party, influence rules and regulations for the state’s democratic party, and help lead organizing efforts.

  • Stephanie Gonzalez

  • Lucia V. Africano

 

Democratic Male State Committee Member 34th Assembly District

State committee members serve two-year terms and vote on elements of the party’s platform, decide who will represent the state to the national party, influence rules and regulations for the state’s democratic party, and help lead organizing efforts.

 

Delegate to Democratic Judicial Convention 34th Assembly District (pick 12)

Judicial delegates are representatives from each Assembly District and serve a one-year term. They nominate their party’s local candidates for New York State Supreme Court Justice at the party’s annual Judicial District Convention.

 

For Assembly District 37

Assembly Member 37th Assembly District

The State Assembly is the lower chamber of the State Legislature. Assembly Members write and vote on legislation, approve state spending levels, and uphold or override the Governor’s vetoes.

 

Democratic Male District leader 37th Assembly District 

District leaders are volunteers elected for two-year terms to represent party members in their assembly district to the Queens Democratic Party. District leaders vote on party leadership, choose local judicial candidates, and influence policies for the local Democratic Party. 

 

Democratic State Committee Member 37th Assembly District 

State committee members serve two-year terms and vote on elements of the party’s platform, decide who will represent the state to the national party, influence rules and regulations for the state’s democratic party, and help lead organizing efforts.

 

Happy voting!

I hope this helps and saves you some googling effort! This information is not transparent - and that keeps people disengaged from voting for their own representation. We can change that!

In heavily democratic New York City, the primary usually determines who will ultimately take office. Yet only 23% of registered democrats and republicans voted in last year’s primary, meaning just a small sample of New Yorkers got to influence the election of Mayor Eric Adams, and other local representatives. When you vote in the primary, your vote has a direct impact on the future of your city, state, and neighborhood.

For more updates like this, you can check out Astoria Live on Instagram or subscribe to the mailing list, where I'll send out August voting info as well. And don't forget to share with your Queens-based friends and family members!

 

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Feel free to email me at hello@astorialive.com.

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